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Food Counts: list of all nutrients

 

ID

KEY DESCRIPTIVE LABEL

OTHER LABELS

INFOPOD NARRATIVE

SOURCE   
 

01

Water

hydrate ... is the most important nutrient: up to four fifths of the human body is water. Water makes up about 85% of the brain, about 80% of the blood, and about 70% of lean muscles. Water is required in the body for the activity of all enzymes and for the assembly and functioning of the components of cell membranes and chromosomes; for dispersing or dissolving nutrients; for dissolving and eliminating waste; and for maintaining the volume of the circulatory system and for maintaining blood pressure. Water is also the main element in most of the foods we eat.  
 

02

Energy

     
 

03

Energy

     
       

04

Protein

  ... is needed for our body tissues to grow and repair themselves. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein, the body can make some of these, but some are called Ďessential amino acidsí because we can only get them from the food we eat. Protein is also a source of energy. These are all good sources of protein: meat; fish; eggs; dairy foods; cereals, such as bread, pasta and rice; pulses; and nuts. Most of these sources of protein (except pulses and nuts) also contain saturated fat. There is no extra benefit from eating levels of protein higher than 40-50 grams a day  
 

05

Fat

     
 

06

Ash

     
 

07

Carbohydrate

     
 

08

Fibre

fiber ...also referred to as indigestible carbohydrates, which is an important part of our diet in order to achieve optimum health and is found in nuts, fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, whole grains. An adequate intake of dietary fibre will help prevent a high risk for bowel cancer, diabetes, diverticular disease or constipation. An ideal amount of fibre per day is around 35 grams, and this level is easily maintained if the diet is balanced and healthy, or can be easily corrected by simply adding dietary fibre supplements. anyvitamins 
 

09

Sugars, total

     
 

10

Sucrose

  ...a disaccaride, Sucrose is one of the sweetest forms of sugars. It is found in granulated, powdered and brown sugar - and molasses and is also found free in nature in a variety of fruits and vegetables. It is  extremely water soluble., anyvitamins
 

11

Glucose

     
 

12

Fructose

levulose

fruit sugar

...a monosaccaride, is found associated with glucose in many fruits, as well as in honey. This highly soluble sugar is also the sweetest of the simple sugars and is fermented in yeast. When combined with glucose it forms sucrose and is the structural unit found in inulin - a polysaccharide found in Jerusalem artichoke, onions as well as garlic. anyvitamins
 

13

Lactose

     
 

14

Maltose

malt sugar ... a disaccaride, found free in nature, but is formed  from starch. It is easily used by the body, and is sometimes used, together with dextrin in infant formulas. anyvitamins
 

15

Galactose

  ...a monosaccaride, not normally found in nature, but is mostly hydrolyzed from lactose which is found in milk. Although not very water-soluble, and less sweet than glucose, forms part of glycolipids and glycoproteins, which is found in many tissues. The body can change glucose to galactose in order to enable the mammary glands to produce lactose. anyvitamins
 

16

Starch

     
 

17

Calcium

  ...good sources include milk, cheese and other dairy foods, green leafy vegetables (such as broccoli, cabbage and okra, but not spinach), soybean products, nuts, bread and anything made with fortified flour, and fish where you eat the bones, such as sardines and pilchards. Calcium helps build strong bones and teeth; regulates muscle contraction including the heartbeat; and makes sure the blood clots normally. Itís thought that calcium may help to lower high blood pressure and may help to protect against colon and breast cancer, although more evidence is needed to support this. Adults need 700 mg a day. 1500 mg or less of calcium supplements a day is unlikely to cause any harm.  

Expert

 

18

Iron

  ... is an essential mineral found in bottled mineral waters and nearly all types of soil. Good sources of iron include liver, meat, beans, nuts, dried fruit (such as dried apricots), whole grains (such as brown rice), fortified breakfast cereals, soybean flour and most dark green leafy vegetables (such as spinach). Iron helps make red blood cells, which carry oxygen around the body. Women who lose a lot of blood during their monthly period may need to think about taking iron supplements. Recommended levels are 6.7 mg a day for men 11.4 mg a day for women.  Taking 17 mg or less of iron supplements a day is unlikely to cause any harm.  

Expert

 

19

Magnesium

  ...a mineral found in a wide variety of foods. The richest sources are green leafy vegetables (such as spinach), and nuts. Good sources include bread, fish, meat and dairy foods. For example it: helps turn the food we eat into energy and helps make sure the parathyroid glands work normally. The parathyroid glands produce hormones important for bone health. You should be able to get all the magnesium you need from your daily diet. This is: 300 mg a day for men 270 mg a day for women. Having 400 mg or less a day of magnesium from supplements is unlikely to cause any harm.  

Expert

 

20

Phosphorus

     
 

21

Potassium

     
 

22

Sodium

     
 

23

Zinc

     
 

24

Copper

     
 

25

Manganese

     
 

26

Selenium

     
 

27

Not listed [Cl]

     
 

28

Not listed [I]

     
 

29

Vitamin C,

     
 

30

Thiamin

     
 

31

Riboflavin

     
 

32

Niacin

     
 

33

Pantothenic acid

     
 

34

Vitamin B-6

     
 

35

Folate, total

     
 

36

Folic acid

     
 

37

Folate, food

     
 

38

Folate, DFE

     
 

39

Vitamin B-12

cyanocobalamin, cobolamin             energy vitamin .. found in virtually all meat products and certain algae such as seaweed. Good sources include meat, particularly liver, salmon, cod, milk, cheese, eggs, yeast extract, and some fortified breakfast cereals. Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin, which means you need it in your diet every day because it canít be stored in the body. Helps make red blood cells and keeps the nervous system healthy helps release energy from the food we eat is needed to process folic acid. Adults need approximately 0.0015 mg a day.Taking 2 mg or less of vitamin B12 supplements a day is unlikely to cause any harm.  

Expert

 

40

Vitamin A, IU

     
 

41

Vitamin A, RAE

     
 

42

Retinol

     
 

43

Vitamin K

     
 

44

Not listed

     
 

45

Not listed

     
 

46

Not listed

     
 

47

Not listed

     
 

48

Not listed

     
 

49

Fatty acids, total saturated

     
 

50

12:0

     
 

51

14:0

     
 

52

16:0

     
 

53

18:0

     
 

54

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

     
 

55

16:1 undifferentiated

     
 

56

18:1 undifferentiated

     
 

57

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

     
 

58

18:2 undifferentiated

     
 

59

18:3 undifferentiated

     
 

60

Cholesterol

     
 

61

Tryptophan

     
 

62

Threonine

     
 

63

Isoleucine

     
 

64

Leucine

  ...an essential amino acid, which cannot be manufactured in the body and is part of the three branched-chain-amino-acids. Supplements and protein powders that contain leucine are used extensively by bodybuilders and other athletes to promote muscle recovery. Leucine helps with the regulation of blood-sugar levels, the growth and repair of muscle tissue (such as bones, skin and muscles), growth hormone production, wound healing as well as energy regulation. It can assist to prevent the breakdown of muscle proteins that sometimes occur after trauma or severe stress. Anyvitamins
 

65

Lysine

     
 

66

Methionine

     
 

67

Cystine

     
 

68

Phenylalanine

     
 

69

Tyrosine

     
 

70

Valine

     
 

71

Arginine

     
 

72

Histidine

     
 

73

Alanine

  ...a non-essential amino acid and is used by the body to build protein and was first isolated in 1879. It is one of the simplest amino acids with respect to molecular structure and is one of the most widely used in protein construction. It is required for the metabolism of glucose and tryptophan and beta-alanine is a constituent of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) as well as coenzyme A. It has also demonstrated a cholesterol-reducing effect in rats. People suffering from Epstein Barr (also sometimes referred to as glandular fever) as well as chronic fatigue syndrome, have been linked to excessively high levels of alanine while having low levels of tyrosine and phenylalanine. People on a very low protein diet, could be at risk of a deficiency Anyvitamins 
 

74

Aspartic acid

     
 

75

Glutamic acid

     
 

76

Glycine

     
 

77

Proline

     
 

78

Serine

     
 

79

Carotene, beta

     
 

80

Carotene, alpha

     
 

81

Cryptoxanthin, beta

     
 

82

Lycopene

     
 

83

Lutein